The Town of Claremont is threatening legal action against concert promoters over noise levels at the Showground, as it fights to prevent Big Day Out returning to the venue.

Big Day Out promoters announced this week the concert would be held at Claremont next year, after crowds were down for this year's event on the Victoria Park foreshore.

But Claremont mayor Jock Barker said the council would oppose any application from both the Big Day Out and the annual rock concert Soundwave, which breached the 72 decibel cap on noise levels this year.

Mr Barker said the council was not opposed to concerts, but was fed up with antisocial behaviour from patrons and the promoters' disregard for noise restrictions.

"Soundwave and Big Day Out promoters have no respect for the residents, nor for council approvals and sound levels, so naturally the council takes a dim view of them," he said.

The Royal Agricultural Society, which owns the Showground, wants to host both events next year. But if the Town of Claremont knocks back the applications, a final decision would rest with the Department of Environment and Conservation.

Claremont chief executive Les Crichton said the council was considering its options - which included possible prosecution against the promoters of Soundwave - after the "blatant breach" of noise restrictions.

Royal Agricultural Society chief executive Martin Molony said the continuing saga over the Showground was embarrassing for WA.

"We've got well-known, international acts and they should be supported from the highest levels of government," he said.

"The biggest sufferers are going to be the patrons who love going to the Big Day Out."

He said although the RAS and promoters did their best to monitor the sound, the restrictions were much harsher in WA than in other States and it was inevitable they would be breached again.

Soundwave and Big Day Out promoter Chris Knight said Claremont was the ideal location for summer concerts in WA and believed the concerts had the support of the community. It was the council's responsibility to notify promoters of noise breaches and it had failed to do so.

The West Australian

Popular videos

Our Picks

Follow Us

More from The West