Hit-run driver freed on parole
Out of jail: Jay Joseph Libri. Picture: Sharon Smith/The West Australian

A man who left a teenager permanently disabled after he deliberately ploughed a car into a group of people outside a 17th birthday party, then fled the scene, has been released from jail on parole.

Jay Joseph Libri served two years and two months behind bars after being found guilty by a jury in February 2012 of dangerous driving causing grievous bodily harm to Ned Mather.

Mr Mather's mother Tracey Moore said yesterday she found it difficult that Libri had been released from jail to get on with his life while her son was still fighting to walk.

Libri was 19 when he deliberately drove towards a group of people outside the party in Duncraig on February 4, 2011.

Mr Mather had life-threatening injuries after he was hit by Libri's car with such force that he smashed a window. He has limited mobility and brain damage.

Libri fled the scene and went to the Moon and Sixpence pub, where he drank and socialised until he was kicked out.

Judge Jeremy Curthoys sentenced Libri in May 2012 to four years jail, saying his actions had been deliberate and demonstrated a "callous and reckless disregard" for others.

He noted Libri's belated remorse and described his actions as "utterly selfish".

But Libri's sentence was reduced to 3 1/4 years after an appeals court accepted the original penalty was disproportionate to the overall criminality of his offending, taking into account his young age and that it was his first jail term.

The 22-year-old was granted parole last month, seven months after the earliest date he could have been released.

In a recently published decision, the Prisoners Review Board decided Libri's release would not pose an unacceptable risk to the community.

His parole conditions ban him from drinking alcohol, attending licensed premises other than cafes and restaurants and contacting Mr Mather.

He also has to undergo breath testing if required by police, urinalysis testing, immediately take up confirmed employment and attend counselling as directed.

The West Australian

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