WA greyhounds are getting the green collar to go unmuzzled in public after recent changes to four-decade-old dog laws.

A State Government-backed program that assesses greyhounds, a racing breed long stereotyped as dangerous, is yet to fail a submitted dog since it started in November.

The greyhounds are monitored closely for aggression in trials with smaller dogs and must pass a rigorous regime before getting a green collar that deems them safe to go out unmuzzled.

But they must still be on a lead at all times.

Program co-ordinator Dana Shaw from not-for-profit group Greyhounds As Pets said the dogs were assessed over one to four nights and so far 17 greyhounds had been cleared.

Ms Shaw said the program increased awareness of greyhounds and the potential for more to be adopted. Even after a dog passed the test, it must still go to a foster home for six weeks for further assessment.

In a demonstration, GAP assessed Juno, a five-year-old bitch owned by Racing and Wagering WA integrity boss Denis Borovica. Juno raced under the name Sovereign Coin and showed little or no aggression towards a French bulldog while together in an enclosed pen.

GAP assessor Mark Morrone, a professional trainer for more than 25 years, said he hoped to shine a "better light" on the breed but was aware he was responsible not to pass rogue dogs.

"Our heads are on the block, so to speak," Mr Morrone said. "We make an unbiased assessment on all dogs and we must ensure they represent the breed as well."

He said the stereotypes that greyhounds were "a chaser" that could harm other breeds was undeserved and critics often wrongly saw the habit of chasing as aggressive rather than for fun.

Mr Morrone said he boarded many dogs from less-regulated breeds that would not pass the green-collar assessment.

The West Australian

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