Australia's internal spy agency ASIO is embroiled in an attempted murder trial involving two Muslim brothers living in Perth's eastern suburb of Cloverdale.

Details of telephone calls intercepted by the agency, together with WA Police "intelligence reports", emerged yesterday as part of a Supreme Court hearing leading up to the trial of 22-year-old Safaa Allami.

Mr Allami, who appeared during yesterday's hearing via video link from Casuarina Prison, has pleaded not guilty to stabbing his elder brother Ali at their family home in October 2010.

In court yesterday, four discs containing intercepted calls and documents with more than 50 pages of information recorded in 2009 and 2010 were disclosed.

It came after submissions by Mr Allami's lawyer Steven Shadgett that he was concerned about the "trickle effect of disclosure" and how to deal with issues surrounding his client's case "without knowing what I'm not to know about".

At one point, Justice Stephen Hall asked Australian Government lawyer Peter Macliver if he needed to close proceedings to the public.

Mr Macliver said that was not necessary.

Mr Shadgett, who referred to ASIO several times, argued that the four telephone intercepts and other "sensitive material" produced yesterday were revealed only after summonses were served on ASIO and the State Director of Public Prosecutions.

He was concerned about the conditions placed on him as part of the disclosures before the trial.

"These calls are in Arabic and can't be translated under the terms of the consent order," Mr Shadgett said. He said there were 155 calls and text messages connected to the case and most were in Arabic.

He told the court he had seen something on one document already disclosed to the defence that was relevant to his client's defence.

That material, he said, was in the possession of the WA Police State security unit.

Detectives charged Mr Allami, who was born in Iraq, two days after his brother was found stabbed and needed surgery at Royal Perth Hospital.

DPP lawyer Nicholas Cogin said yesterday the State was also providing Mr Shadgett with reports relevant to his client that were prebetween October 2009 and October 2010.

WA Police also believed that a redacted version of what was described as "intelligence reports" could be provided to the defence before the trial.

The West Australian

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