A dishonourable danger - full story
A dishonourable danger - full story

Sunday March 24, 2013

Reporter: Derryn Hinch

Producer: Mick O’Donnell

Former Paratrooper Darran Porch served in the Australian and British armies. But this dishonourable ex-soldier also preys on women: he has four convictions so far for bashing four different victims.

On dating websites, Porch calls himself ‘Mr Melbourne’ and presents a handsome, caring and sensitive façade to potential love interests. In reality, Porch is a violent danger to all women. Time and time again, after being jailed for assaulting his victims, Porch has been given bail and gone on to bash again.

Right now, despite pleading guilty to 24 offences of savage domestic violence on his latest victim for which he was given a 40 month jail sentence, he’s again out on bail.

In this major international Sunday Night investigation, reporter Derryn Hinch meets Porch’s unfortunate victims – a trail of battered and traumatised women that stretches across Scotland, Wales, Canada and Australia. And after three years following this shocking abuse of justice, Hinch finally comes face to face with the serial thug for an explosive confrontation.


White Ribbon, Australia’s campaign to stop violence against women.

Victims of Crime Assistance Tribunal, which provides financial assistance to victims of violent crime committed in Victoria.

CLICK HERE to read poetry victim Kim Shirley penned about her time with Darran.

SUNDAY NIGHT asked the Australian Department of Defence a series of questions about the
employment of Darran Porch in the Australian Army. This happened even though he'd been
dishonourably discharged from the British Army and already had convictions for assaults on
women in the UK and Australia. We asked:

Does the Australian Department of Defence check applicants’ criminal records before they are
employed in the Australian services?

Were Army and Defence aware of Darran Porch’s violent criminal past before employing him?

Did Army and Defence check Darran Porch’s British service record?

Were Army and Defence aware Porch had been dishonourably discharged from the British Army?

How can an individual with such a violent criminal record be employed by the Australian services?

On what terms was Porch discharged from the Australian Army?

Given Defence’s commitment to the White Ribbon campaign against domestic violence and
to expanding its recruitment of female service members, can Defence assure our viewers
a man with such a record would no longer be employed in the Australian services?

The response from a Defence spokesperson:

Due to privacy legislation, Defence is unable to comment on individual cases.

Defence can confirm that all applicants to the Australian Defence Force are advised that they must undergo a National Police Check. The results of the National Police Check are taken into consideration when assessing the applicant’s suitability.

Defence does not condone violence or unacceptable behaviour towards women. Such conduct is not representative of the values and ethos of Defence or our members.

Army is committed to preventing and responding to violence against women, both within Army and the wider community. In 2012, Army signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the White Ribbon Foundation, becoming a participant in the White Ribbon workplace accreditation pilot program which seeks to address attitudes and behaviours that allow violence against women to occur.

Commonwealth and Defence Force Ombudsman

The Commonwealth Ombudsman investigates complaints from the general public about the administrative actions of Defence. The Defence Force Ombudsman investigates complaints from serving members, former members and the families of present and former Australian Defence Force members. Further advice or information is available from the Ombudsman website or by phoning 1300 362 072.

Derryn Hinch's response:

The pertinent point in the Defence Department’s quisling response is this: ‘The results of the National Police Check are taken into consideration when assessing the applicant’s suitability.’ If the Australian Army knew about Porch’s violent criminal record he should never have been accepted. If they didn’t know, it’s just as bad. They should have. Surely they verified his British Army claims and his dishonourable discharge would be on file.