Ex-Adelaide scout master Anthony Munro jailed for boys' abuse

AAP

A former Adelaide scout master who engaged in "repulsively evil criminal acts" has been jailed for more than 10 years for abusing two young boys.

Anthony Allan Munro pleaded guilty to 10 charges, including some dating back to the 1960s, in what District Court Judge Paul Slattery described on Tuesday as "predatory conduct" that did inestimable damage.

The 72-year-old groomed the boys by offering them financial and other inducements he knew their parents could not match.

His offending involved a gross breach of trust and occurred over a protracted period, starting when the boy's were as young as 11, the judge said.

Anthony Munro has been jailed for child sex crimes. Photo: 7 News

"Their lives appear to be forever compromised by the repulsively evil criminal acts that you inflicted upon them," Judge Slattery said.

He said offending such as Munro's also had an insidious effect on the community.

"Our society is damaged by the conduct of this type in a way that is inestimable," the judge said.

Munro was first contacted by police while living in Cambodia. He co-operated with detectives and returned to Australia to be charged in June last year.

As well as pleading guilty to the charges, he reached a financial settlement with the victims and had formally apologised, the court heard.

But victim Andrew McIntyre, who agreed to be identified, said Munro's sentence was too short.

"I'm very disappointed but that's the way it goes," he told reporters outside court.

"It's not enough."

Mr McIntyre said the impact of Munro's offending would not go away.

Child sex assault survivor Andrew McIntyre says his abuser's punishment is too light. Source: AAP

"Times have changed, we're all aware of these things," he said.

"When I was a child, it wasn't spoken about. It went on unchecked."

A friend of the second victim said the jailing of Munro would send a message to the community.

"That this sort of offence shouldn't happen because it just destroys trust in people looking after children," he said.

"If there are any other victims out there, I'd encourage them to come forward because they should be heard."

Judge Slattery initially imposed an 18-year sentence on Munro but reduced it to just more than 10 years because of his guilty pleas.

The judge set a non-parole period of five years and five months.