Slovenia centre-left parties try to form minority government

Members of Slovenian parliament, including members of centre-left parties who plan to try to form a minority government, are seen in June 2018

Two months after Slovenia's inconclusive general election, a bloc of centre-left parties announced Monday that they would try to form a minority government after the anti-migrant party that won the biggest share of the vote failed to convince other parties to join it in a coalition.

In the June 3 election, it was actually the anti-migrant centre-right Slovenian Democratic Party (SDS), headed by Janez Jansa, that won the most seats, securing 25 out of a total 90.

But Jansa's efforts to cobble together a ruling majority have failed to come to fruition.

And so five centre-left parties, led by the anti-establishment LMS -- which came second in the election with 13 seats -- are now joining forces to try to form a minority government.

LMS's Marjan Sarec, a comedian-turned-politician who is currently mayor of the town of Kamnik, said he hoped to be nominated as the country's new prime minister.

"We have agreed that our five parties will present a candidate, and expect parliament to appoint him at a session next Monday," Sarec told journalists after meeting the leaders of the other four centre-left parties backing him.

Another left-wing party, Levica, indicated last week it might also be prepared to support a Sarec-led minority government.

But Levica's leader Luka Mesec said Monday that no formal decision had yet been taken.

Sarec warned that without Levica's support, there would no government.

"If, at the end, we do not sign the deal (with Levica), then there will be no government," he said.

Members of Slovenian parliament, including members of centre-left parties who plan to try to form a minority government, are seen in June 2018