Senior Vic Lib loses no confidence motion

·2-min read

Victoria's shadow treasurer has lost a no confidence motion after trading barbs with an upper house crossbencher over the state's pandemic legislation.

Transport Matters Party MP Rod Barton introduced a motion in the upper house to call on senior Liberal MP David Davis to resign as the opposition's Legislative Council leader.

It claims Mr Davis no longer possesses the confidence of the house and alleges he deliberately misled the house with "accusations that impugned Mr Barton's character and reputation".

The motion was debated on Wednesday afternoon and passed 21 votes to nine, with Labor MPs banding together with several crossbenchers.

Opposition Leader Matthew Guy won't take any action, labelling it a political stunt.

"You can have tit for tat motions all you like but the Liberal parliamentary party elects its leadership. It's elected David Davis and I ... have full confidence in him," he told reporters before the vote.

Under parliamentary privilege in August, Mr Davis questioned why Mr Barton changed his vote on Victoria's controversial COVID-19 pandemic bill last year after it stalled in the upper house.

The Liberal MP alleged a $3450 donation was made to Mr Barton by the Labor-aligned Victorian Trades Hall Council about the time he changed his vote.

"There was no money that changed hands, Mr Davis. Once again you are just making things up, grandstanding again," Mr Barton replied.

Mr Davis has moved a counter motion for Mr Barton to explain if the change in his voting pattern resulted from "being corruptly bought off".

"I think that the community will be shocked at the reversal of his vote on the pandemic laws," he told AAP.

It comes as Victoria's parliamentary privileges committee found Reason Party MP Fiona Patten was in contempt of parliament after her foreword of a report into cannabis was leaked to The Age in August 2021.

It found Ms Patten breached the obligation not to disclose material within the report before it was tabled and as the Legal and Social Issues Committee's chair and a second term member she ought to have known the foreword was part of the report.

It called on Ms Patten to apologise to the house for the breaches, while fellow crossbencher Mr Limbrick was cited for a lesser breach.

Both apologised in parliament, with Ms Patten admitting she provided quotes from the report's foreword believing it did not form part of the committee's considerations.

Ms Patten told AAP she didn't expect the breach to jeopardise her position as committee chair in the next term if she retains her upper house seat in November and renominates for the role.