Senator-elect Pauline Hanson warns of 'terror in the streets'

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Pauline Hanson says she's the only one with the guts to challenge the rise of Islam in Australia and the damage multiculturalism is doing to the country.

The soon-to-be senator is confident her One Nation Party will win at least four, and possibly six, Senate seats, and says Family Law reform, creating jobs and putting the brakes on foreign investment are among her top priorities.

Pauline Hanson at a press conference in Brisbane on Monday. Source: 7News.
Pauline Hanson at a press conference in Brisbane on Monday. Source: 7News.

But she also wants a royal commission into whether Islam is a religion or a political ideology, and says it's clear from Saturday's vote for One Nation that a significant number of Australians back what she has to say on that issue.

One Nation ran on a platform that includes an inquiry into Islam, putting surveillance cameras in mosques, limiting Muslim immigration, banning new mosques, and abolishing multiculturalism.

Ms Hanson also wants to abolish the Racial Discrimination Act and wants a referendum on changing the part of the constitution that protects the free practice of religion.

She says Australia is a Christian country and it's time to take a look at the rise of Islam, and what is being preached inside mosques and Islamic schools.

"You have our values, our culture, and our way of life," she said in Brisbane on Monday.


"You don't have a full burqa, you don't keep putting up mosques.

"I'd like to know what they are teaching in those mosques. You can't deny the fact that in these mosques they've been known to preach hate towards us.

"Is this a society we want to live in? I don't believe it is.

"Do you want to see terrorism on our streets here?"

Ms Hanson says that 20 years after her maiden speech to the federal parliament, when she warned Australia was in danger of being "swamped by Asians" some in places like Hurstville in Sydney would agree that's played out.

"They feel that they have been swamped by Asians," she told reporters in Brisbane.

"And regardless of that now, a lot of Australians feel Asians are buying up prime agricultural land, housing."

She said she was not in favour of returning to a White Australia policy, but a return to the old-fashioned values that made the nation great.

"Clearly the way our nation is going is not in the right direction.

"My opinions and my policies were clearly accepted by the Australian people just last Saturday."

Hanson could be bringing another member of her party into the Senate.
Hanson could be bringing another member of her party into the Senate.
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