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Roast Peppers All At Once Under Your Broiler For Easy Blistering

charred roasted peppers
charred roasted peppers - Jules1601/Shutterstock

Few ingredients boast the culinary versatility of peppers. From dried chiles in a salsa to stuffed bell peppers, and just a raw addition in a salad, the fruit can be prepared with a wide variety of techniques. And while all offer their own unique advantage, roasting peppers reveals an especially delicious result. The exterior skin becomes blistered and withered away, and the flesh turns smokey-sweet. Especially when it comes to meatier examples like poblanos or bell peppers, you've likely heard of the gas burner method: This involves roasting the peppers over a gas flame. While a great technique, especially for its speed, it does pose a practical problem when dealing with a larger volume of peppers at once.

So, instead, utilize the broiler for the same task. Slice the peppers into flat sections, then place them onto a rack near the heat source. It'll only take around 15 minutes for them to attain the same effect, after which they can be peeled and added to recipes in a variety of ways.

Read more: The 20 Best Olive Oils For Cooking

Broil Peppers In The Oven For Convenience

sheet pan of roasted peppers
sheet pan of roasted peppers - DiPres/Shutterstock

In addition to broiling a large quantity of peppers at once, the technique also makes it easy to handle irregularly shaped produce. Whenever broiling slender serranos or other thin chile varieties, there's no need to worry about them falling through the burner grate. The pan also allows for the roasting of other vegetables all at once, too, like tomatoes, garlic, and onion, to craft a salsa. For an extra bold flavor, don't forget to drizzle with oil prior to putting the peppers in the oven.

And while roasted peppers can make for a side dish of their own, don't overlook all the other ways they can be utilized, too. Throw them into romesco sauce for that classic smokey flavor, or add them to aromatic salads such as Moroccan zaalouk. You can invigorate hummus with a new twist, or take a cheesy route and craft a batch of rajas con crema with some broiled poblanos peppers. There'll never be a short supply of applications, so feel free to fill up the pan; there will always be a way to enjoy them.

Read the original article on Tasting Table.