Wild theory about Queen's mystery illness before death

·News Reporter
·3-min read

A royal expert made wild claims about the Queen's health before her death, saying the monarch suffered from "a serious and invariably fatal" bone condition.

Buckingham Palace announced last Thursday Queen Elizabeth, 96, died "peacefully" at her Balmoral home, and while the cause of death hasn't been confirmed, royal biographer Lady Colin Campbell claims that the Queen had bone cancer.

"Her death was relatively painless," she revealed in a video posted to YouTube on Friday but filmed the day before, hours before the news of her death had been officially released.

"Bone cancer is not fun but she is fortunate enough to have had the lesser of the forms of bone cancer and she kept her spirits and her vitality, practically to the end."

Royal expert and biographer Lady Colin Campbell made claims about the Queen's health in a YouTube video before her death. Source: YouTube/Lady Colin Campbell
Royal expert and biographer Lady Colin Campbell made claims about the Queen's health in a YouTube video before her death. Source: YouTube/Lady Colin Campbell

The royal expert, who's written books about Princess Diana and the Queen Mother, said in the video the Queen's health "was really rather worse than people thought it was".

She implied that she'd known for some time but "out of respect for her, I was not going to say what I knew".

"The time has come to come clean. The Queen has been suffering from a serious and invariable fatal condition of the bones," Lady Campbell said.

"There are two maladies of the bones, one is more painful than the other. Fortunately, the Queen’s malady, although it falls in the same category and condition of the more painful one, has been the less painful one."

Cause of bruising on Queen's hands

In the last public photo of the Queen, taken just two days before her death, people were quick to point out the obvious bruising on her hands which sparked speculation she did not have long left.

The last photo taken of the Queen in her Balmoral home two days before her death. Source: AAP
The last photo taken of the Queen in her Balmoral home two days before her death. Source: AAP

Lady Campbell said the condition was "restrictive" and implied the bruising on the Queen's hands was "due to cannulas".

The first part of the video appears to have been filmed right before the Queen's death when the news came that doctors became concerned about her deteriorating condition. But the footage cuts abruptly before Lady Colins returns after learning of the Queen's passing.

"Having just made this video it is with great sadness that I have to inform you that events have yet again overtaken one’s plans, and I am reliably informed that the Queen died at 14.37pm this afternoon," she says.

"The reason why the announcement has not been made so far is that they are waiting for Harry and Meghan to arrive at Balmoral after which an announcement will be made."

Queen subjected to 'tremendous stress'

Lady Campbell claimed the Queen's condition was caused by the "tremendous stress to which she has been subjected over the last three years."

She made particular note of Megan and Harry who in 2020 stepped down as senior members of the royal family and moved to the US.

"The Meghan and Harry dog and pony show has been the thing that has caused more grief for the Queen than anything else, and more pressure," she said.

"Can you imagine an older woman, as her life is winding down, and she is hoping to enjoy the last few years of her life in good health being bombarded by the tremendous abuse to which she and the monarchy have been subjected."

Medical experts reportedly told News Corp that frailty and "geriatric syndrome" may have contributed to the late sovereign’s declining health.

Buckingham Palace has not yet revealed specific details about the Queen's cause of death.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle after Queen's death
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle after Queen's death: Source: AAP

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