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A 152kg bouncer has been found guilty of murdering a New Zealand man by pushing him out of a second-storey hotel window.

A West Australian Supreme Court jury delivered a guilty verdict against Stefan Pahia Schmidt, 26, late on Wednesday.

Schmidt had not denied pushing Andrew Marshall, 29, through the window of the Ocean Beach Hotel in Perth's upmarket Cottesloe in May 2011, but had pleaded not guilty, saying the death was an accident.

Mr Marshall was a cousin of slain Manawatu farmer Scott Guy. The trial of Mr Guy's brother-in-law Ewen Macdonald for murder is continuing in the Wellington High Court.

In his closing address to the Perth jury on Tuesday, defence lawyer Tom Percy conceded Schmidt should not have fled the pub as Mr Marshall lay dying on the footpath outside.

Mr Marshall had been talking to two girls with his back to the window when Schmidt approached and told the women - whom he knew - to go home.

He also told Mr Marshall to "f*** off" and then pushed him after Mr Marshall allegedly said something in reply.

Prosecutor Amanda Forrester, during her own jury address, had described Schmidt as "like a coil, ready to spring" when he "sprung on Mr Marshall".

She said any reasonable person - not to mention a former crowd controller with fight experience - would have known the dangers of pushing a man standing in front of a second-storey window.

"The accused didn't just push (Mr Marshall) towards the window, he pushed him at it, through it," she said.

Mr Marshall's father Alan said he and his wife Wendy travelled to Perth to get answers about their son's final hours and death, and honour their treasured family member.

"There is no other place that we could be today," he told reporters outside the court.

"It has been heartbreaking and difficult to listen to.

"We knew it was going to be tough attending the trial and we weren't mistaken.

"It has been gruelling and harrowing, at times more than we could bear."

They had found little relief and comfort in what they had heard, he said.

"We didn't come seeking closure or even justice.

"The truth for us is that there is no verdict or outcome that will bring Andy back to us.

"We don't want to be bitter and waste our energy with regrets and grudges - that would be just punishing ourselves over and over - but we do want to send a strong message that violence is unacceptable and intolerable."

In his closing address to the Perth jury on Tuesday, defence lawyer Tom Percy conceded Schmidt should not have fled the pub as Mr Marshall lay dying on the footpath outside.

Mr Marshall had been talking to two girls with his back to the window when Schmidt approached and told the women - whom he knew - to go home.

He also told Mr Marshall to "f*** off" and then pushed him after Mr Marshall allegedly said something in reply.

Prosecutor Amanda Forrester, in her own address to the jury, had described Schmidt as "like a coil, ready to spring" when he "sprung on Mr Marshall".

She said any reasonable person - not to mention a former crowd controller with fight experience - would have known the dangers of pushing a man standing in front of a second-storey window.

"The accused didn't just push (Mr Marshall) towards the window, he pushed him at it, through it," she said.

Schmidt, a trained boxer, appeared surprised by the verdict, holding his head in his hands and crying as the jury left the court.

Sentencing is scheduled for September.

NZ Newswire

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