Qld energy minister rejects nuclear power

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Queensland's energy minister has dismissed nuclear energy as "old-fashioned" and "dangerous" amid national debate on solving the power crisis.

Mick de Brenni says all options are on the table to deal with soaring electricity prices and surging east coast gas prices.

However, he rules out calls by federal Opposition Leader Peter Dutton and Nationals leader David Littleproud for nuclear energy to be part of the discussion.

"With a nuclear ban in place since 2007, Queenslanders have emphatically rejected nuclear power time and time again and that will not change," Mr de Brenni told AAP.

"Electricity consumers, whether they are households or companies, want renewables, not old-fashioned, dangerous options."

Mr Dutton said this week he was not afraid to talk about nuclear energy as an option to guarantee electricity supply and reduce emissions.

"I don't think we should rule things out simply because it's unfashionable to talk about them," Mr Dutton told ABC radio on Monday.

Mr de Brenni said renewable energy and battery storage was the best long-term solution to Queensland's woes, with household and business electricity bills to surge at least nine per cent in 2022/23.

That comes after wholesale electricity prices quadrupled to $171 per megawatt hour in the year to March, on the back of increased demand and generators setting higher prices amid soaring coal and gas costs.

The state government will give households a one-off rebate of $175, but electricity prices are unlikely to fall until 2024, according to the Australian Energy Regulator.

Mr de Brenni has resisted calls that he order state-owned generators to bid lower on the wholesale market, like his predecessor did in 2017.

"The formula we are following to keep downward pressure on power prices focuses on connecting more renewables and back-up storage to our grid," he said.

The minister said by the end of next year the state would have another 1700 MW of wind, 1363 MW of solar and at least 300 MW of storage in its energy system.

"Queensland will also maintain its advantage by owning its power assets, so we continue to return the dividends to Queenslanders, like the recent $175 cost of living rebate," Mr de Brenni said.

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