Police review may follow Qld custody death

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A review of how police-related deaths are investigated in Queensland is being considered after Brisbane mother Cindy Miller died at an Ipswich watch house.

Consideration of an independent review was recommended by state coroner Terry Ryan as part of the inquest into Ms Miller's death in 2018.

"The recommendation of an independent review into the current arrangements for the investigation of police related deaths is something I am looking into, and I have asked the department to brief me on ways in which we can implement this in Queensland," Attorney-General Shannon Fentiman said in a statement on Wednesday.

Ms Miller's death was not suspicious but due to a lethal combination of drugs in her system and an existing heart condition, the inquest was told last year.

"While from my perspective the current arrangements for the investigation of police related deaths are generally effective, I acknowledge that community confidence in the independent investigation of police related deaths is a matter of significant public interest," Mr Ryan said in his findings delivered in January.

"I recommend that the Queensland government consider whether to commission an independent review of the current arrangements for the investigation of police related deaths on behalf of the coroner and the oversight of those investigations."

Ms Miller was put in a single cell where she was required to be checked by officers at least every hour, the inquest was told.

During a check at 1.35am on April 21 2018, she was found unresponsive and could not be resuscitated.

A post-mortem examination found she had an undiagnosed heart condition and a "lethal combination of substances" in her system.

Queensland is also the only jurisdiction that has not moved to scrap public drunkenness laws as recommended by the Deaths In Custody royal commission 30 years ago.

Police Minister Mark Ryan said there were alternatives to detaining intoxicated people in custody, but the state had no plans to remove the offence.