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Meet the adorable puppy who constantly faints for no reason

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Peter is a loving, happy one-year-old cocker spaniel with a rare condition that causes him to stiffen and faint when he becomes overstimulated.

The doe-eyed pup was adopted by the Emma Clayton and her family in the UK city of Sheffield after his first family could no longer care for him.

Pete has been falling since he first learned to walk and despite countless visits to different vets, his condition remains a mystery.

Pete the dog flipped on his side with his paws in the air.
Pete 'flips out' when he spots birds on his daily walks. Source: Caters

His Instagram account called Petrified Pete, is followed by almost 26,000 fans who are following his journey filled with charming videos of Pete fainting when he gets excited, nervous or sometimes for no reason at all.

His family have lovingly dubbed Pete’s condition ‘fainting goat syndrome’ – after the breed of myotonic goats who are known for ‘fainting’ – but they are hoping to find a professional diagnosis for the odd condition.

Owners Emma Clayton (left) and Oliver Broomhead (right) and their son, assure Pete's fans that he is a happy and healthy puppy who just happens to faint.
Owners Emma Clayton (left) and Oliver Broomhead (right) and their son, assure Pete's fans that he is a happy and healthy puppy who just happens to faint.

Despite some concerns from fans, Pete’s family assures everyone that he is a happy and healthy puppy, and they keep an eye on him to make sure he doesn’t hurt himself during fainting spells.

Although Pete doesn’t loose consciousness, he does suddenly freeze and tip over two to three times a day, usually on walks.

His fainting triggers include birds, rain, other dogs, heights and walking from grass to concrete.

Pete the fainting dog tilting his head and posing for a photo.
A vet thinks Pete may have a condition called episodic muscular hypertonicity but the puppy will need to travel to Germany for a confirmed diagnosis. Source: Caters

At his latest vet consultation, Pete’s vet thinks he may have a condition called episodic muscular hypertonicity but he will need specialised testing in Germany to confirm the neurological condition.

Pete’s owners have started a crowdfunding campaign to help with his medical bills as they seek a diagnosis and treatment.

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