Passenger photos reveal what it's really like on Qantas' 17-hour non-stop London flight

Passengers onboard the non-stop flight from Perth to London have given an insight into what it was like to travel on the landmark 17-hour flight.

The Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner touched down in London at 5.05 am on Sunday having covered a distance of more than 14,484 km.

Even with unique features, including lower cabin altitude, larger windows and menus designed to reduce jetlag, there was much speculation as to how passengers would cope on the long-haul journey.

Economy passenger Wayne Kwong documented his journey, sharing images from inside the plane including the self-serve pantry where those on-board could help themselves to a snack or drink.

Passengers raved about the specially designed meals. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong
Passengers raved about the specially designed meals. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong
Those onboard the long haul flight could also help themselves to the self serve pantry. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong
Those onboard the long haul flight could also help themselves to the self serve pantry. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong
Economy passengers were given some extra luxuries to help them relax. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong
Economy passengers were given some extra luxuries to help them relax. Source: Twitter/Wayne Kwong

“Specially designed meals for this ultra longhaul flight. Tasty, filling but not heavy on your stomach! Well Done Qantas,” he wrote.

He said the legroom was more than sufficient but pointed out there was a “lovely retro pillow" on offer to help prevent knee injuries for anyone taller.

A free trip to Rottnest Island is now being offered to the first group of travellers on the return leg, a non-stop flight from London to Perth.


FACTS ABOUT THE AIRCRAFT

Qantas staff wave goodbye to flight QF10 as she leaves the gate from Heathrow en route to Perth. Source: Getty
Qantas staff wave goodbye to flight QF10 as she leaves the gate from Heathrow en route to Perth. Source: Getty
Qantas CEO Alan Joyce, centre, and chef Neil Perry, right, serve food to attendees during a media event ahead of the flight. Source: Getty
Qantas CEO Alan Joyce, centre, and chef Neil Perry, right, serve food to attendees during a media event ahead of the flight. Source: Getty

* Operated by four pilots, with one or two pilots resting at any one time
* The flight will follow different paths depending on wind
* The third longest commercial flight in operation (14,498km) and the world's longest Dreamliner flight
* It carries about 92 tonnes, or 110,000 litres, of fuel
* The aircraft seats 236 passengers
* Menus have been designed to maintain hydration, aid sleep and reduce jetlag
* Windows are 65 per cent bigger than comparable aircraft and can be adjusted electronically
* When travelling from Heathrow to Melbourne, one free stopover is permitted in Perth in each direction.

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