One Nation plans beyond Hanson: WA leader

Sophie Moore

Pauline Hanson is on the hunt for a successor as leader of One Nation but her loyal West Australian chief says her political comeback will last at least "10 years".

Upper house MP Colin Tincknell says transition is just a part of politics and when a party is in its birth there was always one stand out, but One Nation would exist after Senator Hanson retires.

"Pauline is aware of that, she's looking naturally for a successor in the future but that's a long way off," Mr Tincknell told reporters in Perth on Tuesday.

If Senator Hanson puts her hand up for the next federal election and gets in again, she will have served in Canberra for 10 years.

Mr Tincknell says having Senator Hanson's name on the party is a bonus.

"She's a vote-getter, you'd be crazy not to use that."

Mr Tincknell was speaking at the announcement of the party's new state president to replace Doug Shaw, who quit in anger to run as an independent in the Darling Range state by-election.

He says Mr Shaw was "pissed off" when the party rejected his candidacy nomination after he failed the vetting process.

Mr Tincknell rejected suggestions Senator Hanson personally chose candidates and party executives, saying former Liberal MP Paul Filing was picked by the party's national executive, which included her, as Mr Shaw's replacement.

Mr Tincknell insists the party has strengthened its vetting process since losing most of its candidates in the 2016 federal election to scandal or infighting.