NTUC FairPrice explains label of $72.27 organic kampung chicken

·Senior Editor
·2-min read
Organic kampung chicken sold by NTUC FairPrice. (PHOTO: Facebook/NTUC FairPrice)
Organic kampung chicken sold by NTUC FairPrice. (PHOTO: Facebook/NTUC FairPrice)

SINGAPORE — A widely circulated photo of an NTUC FairPrice label for "SB Whole Chicken" priced at $72.27 has prompted a clarification from the supermarket chain.

In a post on its Facebook page on Thursday (2 June), FairPrice said the label was affixed on Swiss Butchery-branded packaging. The label is for an organic kampung chicken sold at one of FairPrice’s concessionaire counters run by Swiss Butchery.

“This product is priced at $22.50/kg (per the label's packed date on 31 May 2022), and the product label also showed the product weight of over 3kg as 2 whole birds were packed together, weighed and priced under the same label,” said FairPrice, which did not mention the $72.27 total price in its post.

"We hope this helps to dispel any possible misunderstanding this image may have caused."

The post has prompted comments from many Facebook users. One Angela Lau said, “There's no misunderstanding here. We're just appalled by the price of $22.50/kg for organic kampung chicken sold at NTUC Fairprice.” Another user, Jan Dela Cruz, said, “This chicken has the taste of wagyu beef. Must try!”

A check on FairPrice’s website shows several whole chickens that are considerably cheaper than the SB organic kampung chicken on a per kg basis.

Among them are a 1.4 kg Kee Song fresh whole chicken priced at $11.20 ($8 per kg), a 1kg Aw’s Market fresh whole chicken at $15.95 and a 2kg Zack Butchery whole chicken at $20 ($10 per kg).

Some whole chickens sold by NTUC FairPrice. (SCREENSHOTS: NTUC FairPrice's website)
Some whole chickens sold by NTUC FairPrice. (SCREENSHOTS: NTUC FairPrice's website)

The post came after the short supply and higher prices of fresh chickens have been dominating discussions in Singapore in the past week amid Malaysia’s chicken export ban. Malaysia accounted for about a third of Singapore’s total chicken imports last year.

The ban has forced chicken sellers and restaurants in Singapore to urgently seek alternative supplies while customers express concerns about the sustained high prices of chicken and other basic food items.

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