NSW gets less federal infrastructure cash

Jodie Stephens and Finbar O'Mallon
NSW has in line for a federal cash splash to fast-track rail and road projects

NSW is getting a smaller share of a multi-billion dollar federal government cash splash than other states to fast-track rail and road projects.

Just $570 million is heading to NSW as the federal government pumps $3.8 billion into infrastructure projects across the nation to boost a sluggish economy.

The Morrison government has pledged $1.3 billion for Queensland, while Western Australia will get an $868 million injection. South Australia is set to receive $415 million.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian on Thursday said NSW was the victim of its own economic success when she was quizzed about the state's funding compared to Queensland.

"We're actually top of the tree which is why other states are having to be supported," she told reporters in Sydney.

"We're doing very well in NSW but I always say to the (prime minister) we're able to fast track a lot of things if you give us that extra support and he's open to that and I'm sure they'll come to the party."

The NSW package includes the acceleration of $530 million in previously-planned funding for regional projects including Newell Highway upgrades and the Princes Highway Corridor.

An extra $20 million will go towards the final link of the Pacific Highway upgrade from Woolgoolga to Ballina and $4 million for the Dixons Long Point Crossing project between Orange and Mudgee.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the projects would cut travel times and make roads safer while boosting jobs and the economy.

Ms Berejiklian in a statement said the result of the close working relationship between NSW and the federal government was "plain for all to see".

"Accelerated federal funding for key initiatives ... will enable us to get on with the job of delivering the state's record infrastructure investment program," she said.

The federal government has been spruiking its $100 billion infrastructure pipeline since its last budget but has copped criticism in recent months about the speed of delivery.

The Reserve Bank of Australia earlier this year called for the government to bring forward infrastructure spending to boost the economy.