No more than two people can gather in Australia under the latest coronavirus restrictions. Here's what else isn't allowed.

Jack Derwin
  • Australians will be even further restricted from Monday, as the government announces new tough measures to curb the spread of COVID-19.
  • Australians will be prohibited from gathering in groups larger than two outside, with only families and households excepted.
  • Meanwhile, public playgrounds, and skate parks will be closed while bootcamps will end, with only one-on-one training sessions allowed.
  • Visit Business Insider Australia's homepage for more stories.

The federal government appears to be tightening its rules almost by the day in a desperate effort to stop the spread of COVID-19.

Under the latest iteration, announced on Sunday evening, Australians will not be allowed to gather in any grouping larger than two, with only families or households excepted, as the toll of the coronavirus continues to rise.

"Hundred of thousands of people have left the labour face, left the workforce, thousands upon thousands of businesses have had to shut their doors. Sixteen people [in Australia] in total now have lost their lives, including two today. It is a very difficult time," Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in his second media conference of the day."

To help enforce social distance, Morrison also announced public playgrounds and skateparks will be closed from Monday, while boot camps – which were operating with up to 10 people – can only involve two people.

Weddings will continue to be restricted to five people, and funerals to ten.

The most vulnerable demographics have been advised to self-isolate as much as practical, including those aged over 70 years, those with chronic conditions over 60, and Indigenous Australians 50 years and older.

All others have been advised to stay home for all reasons other than exercise, grocery shopping, medical care, compassionate needs, exercise, and work or employment if it absolutely cannot be done remotely.

It comes as "the rate of increase" of the virus' spread continues to slow, with growth falling from around 25-30% a day, to 9% on Sunday, according to the federal government. Despite that, 1600 people went into quarantine on Sunday.

Leaving to attend a Treasury meeting, Morrison said his government was finalising further economic measures to be announced in the coming days, to support businesses and jobs so "we can return to life as we knew it at some point in the future".

He revealed that at the meeting of the National Cabinet, state and territory leaders agreed to a set of principles that will put a moratorium on evictions for the next six months for both residential and commercial tenants "if unable to meet their commitments"

While asking banks to support this measure, Morrison also emphasised the fact that commercial tenants and landlords alike will be expected to come to their arrangements. If not, Morrison suggested government support may be withheld.

Australians were also encouraged to sign up to the Government's WhatsApp messaging service to receive directs updates going forward.