No jail for woman after fake abuse claims

·2-min read

After a medical examination found Makaela Bacon's injuries inconsistent with her claims she had been choked unconscious, the 19-year-old doubled down.

Following breaking up with a man she had briefly dated, the Melbourne woman claimed as well as trying to strangle her, he pushed her down a flight of stairs.

She claimed she somersaulted down and hit her head, but wasn't injured.

A CT scan of her neck showed a normal result with no apparent injuries, while photos of marks on her neck were found to be inconsistent with bruising caused by attempted strangulation.

But she signed a more detailed second statement outlining the apparent attack.

Police took out a family violence intervention order to protect her from the man, and her lies escalated.

The now 21-year-old avoided a prison sentence on Tuesday and instead was placed on an 18-month court order mandating mental health treatment after she admitted five charges of perjury.

She claims she feels like "the worst person in the world" over her actions.

Bacon went back to police multiple times to make statements about the man, claiming he breached the intervention order by sending her threatening messages.

One message said "You deserved to die that day" while another said "I'm going to slit your throat and stab you".

Police arrested the man but became suspicious that the messages were not real when they found no evidence of them on his phone.

Bacon's own phone was taken for analysis, and images were found saved in a folder called "fake messages".

Despite knowing her phone records were being searched, Bacon continued to double down with further reports to police.

She told police the man had sent her photos of her house and a knife with a message saying "Murder weapon. You're not safe".

Bacon was arrested and admitted the messages were fake.

She claimed the initial allegations were true and she thought if police believed he had breached the court order her case would be taken more seriously.

Bacon has a history of mental illness including hallucinations and a belief that someone has implanted a chip in her.

Bacon's victim was never charged with anything, but the investigation must have been stressful and a cause of anxiety for him, County Court Judge Peter Rozen said.

He ordered she be supervised for 18 months and be assessed for and receive any recommended mental health treatment and counselling as part of her sentence.