The new airline rule that will benefit passengers

There could be some relief in store for frequent flyers with legislation set to be introduced to require airlines to have a minimum seat size.The Federal Aviation Administration in the US would be required to set minimum requirements for seat sizing – meaning a break from ever-shrinking legroom and cramped quarters. 

While it’s being introduced in the US – it could affect overseas airlines too.

The regulation of seat width and legroom is part of a five-year extension of federal aviation programs announced early Saturday by Republican and Democratic leaders of the House and Senate committees that oversee the US’s air travel.

The Federal Aviation Administration in the US would be required to set minimum requirements for seat sizing under new legislation. Source: Getty Images (File pic)

The room between rows — measured from a point on one seat to the same point on the seat in the next row — has been shrinking for many years as airlines squeeze more seats onto their planes. It was once commonly about 86cm, and is now less than 76cm on some planes.

Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida said lawmakers from both chambers agreed it was time to take action on “ever-shrinking seats.”

“Relief could soon be on the way for weary airline passengers facing smaller and smaller seats,” Mr Nelson said.

No more bumping of passengers from planes

The bill also would prohibit the involuntary bumping of passengers who have already boarded a plane.

But in a nod to the power of the commercial airliners, lawmakers declined to include language that would have prohibited airlines from imposing fees deemed “not reasonable and proportional.”

Dr David Dao gets removed from a United Airlines flight in 2017. Source: 7 News

In April last year, video of Dr David Dao being forcibly removed from an overbooked United Airlines flight went viral. 

Dr Dao, a Vietnamese-American, was filmed with a bloodied mouth after being removed from his seat leading to outraged passengers and viewers across the globe.

The airline later apologised.

With Associated Press