More wild weather to follow US tornadoes

·2-min read

A day after violent tornadoes have killed at least five people in Alabama and left residents sorting through the destruction, storm forecasters issued another "severe weather risk" warning for the US south this weekend.

After reports of 24 tornadoes striking Alabama and Georgia on Thursday, rough weather on Saturday could stir more tornadoes in Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and the surrounding area, according to the National Weather Service.

Five people were killed in Alabama, NWS reported, although it could be days before the death count is finalised. Dozens of others were injured and entire neighbourhoods destroyed.

A sixth death was tied to a tornado in Georgia.

In northern Alabama, the five confirmed fatalities were in Ohatchee, a town of about 1200 people, according to the Calhoun County Emergency Management Agency.

Survivors described harrowing scenes of seeking cover from the twisters.

As she searched through a mountain of debris that a day earlier had been her father's Alabama home, Rebecca Haynes Griffis recounted how her brother's fast thinking helped both men survive the disaster.

"He saw it coming and he put my dad into a big bear hug and held onto him until things stopped moving," Griffis told Reuters.

"The whole house started to contort around them. There was no roof all of a sudden. It came and it took them," said Griffis, a COVID-19 travel nurse who was in Georgia when disaster struck in Ohatchee on Thursday afternoon.

Her father, Mac Haynes, 78, and brother Philip Haynes, 50, landed in a pasture about 10 metres away from the foundation that once supported their trailer home, which was reduced to shreds.

Both men were hospitalised, with her father expected to be released on Friday. Her brother, who suffered fractures to his spine, ribs, shoulder and cheek, will remain hospitalised, Griffis said.

Griffis, 48, said she has been frantically calling her father and brother from Georgia on Thursday to urge them to seek shelter in a neighbour's home that has a basement.

"By the time they answered, it was on them," Griffis said.

For three hours, the fire department cut through debris to reach the injured men in the field when suddenly winds started swirling again, possibly from a nearby tornado.

The fire department grabbed the men and fled to the nearby home's basement, seeking refuge until they could safely transport the injured to hospital, Griffis said.