Man denies intent to kill during shooting

A murder trial has heard a man admit to shooting another man after a drug dispute but denying he intended to kill him.

Brisbane Supreme Court on Thursday was played audio from multiple interviews between Justin John Meale and police.

Meale, 31, has pleaded not guilty to the murder Clinton Pollock, 35, who was shot outside his home in Deception Bay, north of Brisbane, on Father's Day four years ago.

Police recorded the audio while taking photographs of Meale and his identifying marks on the day after he was charged with murder in September 2018.

Meale told Detective Sergeant Michael Thomas that he wanted to speak to him again about Pollock's death.

"I want to be straight up. I did not mean to kill him. I shot him but I did not mean to kill him," Meale told Det Sgt Thomas.

Meale said he wanted to change his evidence because his alleged co-offender - who had driven him to the shooting - had "rolled" and spoken to police.

"We did it together ... We were like Batman and Robin," Meale said.

Meale admitted to trading methamphetamine for dozens of .22 calibre bullets for his sawn-off bolt-action rifle about four days before the shooting.

He said Pollock later threatened to shoot up his house and his parent's house with a semi-automatic firearm over claims he owed a gram of methamphetamine.

"It's my 15 (bullets) to your one; I will take out your whole scummy crew," Meale claimed Pollock said to him.

Meale said he was scared and worried for his family and decided to shoot Mr Pollock in the shoulder.

"(The co-offender) said 'shoot him in the leg', but I said there were too many arteries," Meale said.

Forensic pathologist Andrew Scott Reid earlier testified he performed an autopsy on Pollock and found he had been killed by a single .22 calibre gunshot to the chest.

Dr Reid's autopsy report showed the bullet entered Pollock's chest on his right side just below the nipple, damaging his heart, liver and a major vein connected to his liver.

The pathologist said the bullet "tumbled" on impact and forged a crooked path through Pollock before hitting his left rear ribs and failing to exit his body.

A toxicology screening found high levels of methamphetamine and benzodiazepine in Pollock's system, but Dr Reid said drug use did not contribute to his death.

The trial continues.