Local govt minister to seek greater powers

Queensland's local government minister is seeking greater powers to sack councillors and mayors who have been charged with criminal offences.

Stirling Hinchliffe will meet with the Queensland chair of the Crime and Corruption Commission and president of the Local Government Association Queensland (LGAQ) ahead of Tuesday's cabinet meeting to seek support.

"It's really clear the people of Queensland want to see some action around all the allegations and concerns coming out of local government right now," Deputy Premier Jackie Trad told reporters on Sunday.

Ms Trad said changes to allow Mr Hinchliffe to sack those hit with criminal offences are important and will be fast-tracked along with prohibiting donations from developers to local councillors.

Mr Hinchliffe will look at a wide-range of reforms and is considering a separate commission to oversee the public service.

LGAQ President Mark Jamieson called the idea 'ludicrous' and said he'd been overwhelmed with calls from furious mayors across Queensland.

"I spoke with the Queensland premier today and warned her this will fundamentally change the relationship between state and local governments if this goes ahead," he said in a statement.

The LNP also lashed out at the concept on Sunday, saying there was already plenty of regulators in place.

"There are regulators falling out of the trees," LNP Shadow Attorney-General David Janetzki told reporters.

"The cost on the Queensland taxpayer of Labor creating another bureaucracy to address these problems is unnecessary."

The local government scandal reached tipping point last week when a decision was made to appoint an administrator to Ipswich City Council following a series of corruption charges.

On the Fraser Coast, acting mayor George Seymour claimed victory in the council's by-election on Sunday days after sacked mayor Chris Loft had his review application dismissed.