'Leave it in the shop': Deadly warning over doggie Christmas treats


Pet owners are being warned not to buy cheap Christmas treats for their dogs ahead of the holidays.

Southeast Queensland animal rescue Happy Tails took to Facebook to warn shoppers not to buy the treats, which are now in stock in many stores.

“Many of these so-called treats end up with the dog ‘enjoying’ some time in a veterinary surgery over Christmas,” Happy Tails wrote.

“The vast majority of these rawhide products and treats come from China.”

Southeast Queensland animal rescue Happy Tails is warning shoppers not to buy cheap dog treats ahead of the holidays because they could make their pets sick. Source: Facebook/ Happy Tails
Southeast Queensland animal rescue Happy Tails is warning shoppers not to buy cheap dog treats ahead of the holidays because they could make their pets sick. Source: Facebook/ Happy Tails

Happy Tails added the products are made from cattle and horse hides, but are normally stripped of fat and hair using toxic sodium sulphide

“More chemicals are used in order to split the hide into layers which is then washed with hydrogen peroxide to give the white ‘pure’ look and remove the rancid smell,” it wrote.

Happy Tails claims the products also contain arsenic, mercury, chromium and formaldehyde, which can cause intestinal blockages, poisoning and cause dogs to choke.

“Leave them in the shop where they belong or if some well-meaning person buys them for your dog put them safely away for later, then dispatch in the bin,” Happy Tails wrote.

Southeast Queensland animal rescue Happy Tails is warning shoppers not to buy cheap dog treats ahead of the holidays because they could make their pets sick.
The animal rescue said it’s best for shoppers to buy something else or risk a trip to the vet. Source: Getty Images (File pic)

Last month, Albion Veterinary Surgery urged the public to keep waterways tidy after a pup managed to swallow a fishing hook in Brisbane.

Luckily, Dr Andrew managed to perform successful surgery on Tilla the Jack Russell Cross.

The radiographs showed a large 4cm fishing hook with a barb that had become embedded in Tilla’s stomach lining.