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Inside The Atelier: Prada's impossible embroideries

prada embroideries
Inside The Atelier: Prada's impossible embroideryCourtesy of Prada

It is easy to take for granted the craftsmanship that goes into making some of the world's most beautiful luxury products, which makes it all the more fascinating when you have the opportunity to see the process for yourself. Our new franchise, Inside The Atelier, celebrates exactly this. For our latest iteration, Prada has invited us in to see how its most intricate embroideries come to life.

One of the most complex techniques used in the house's spring/summer 2024 collection involves the creation of those garments that consist solely of fringe and embroidery. The workmanship on these pieces uses both simple and precious raw materials, such as threads for fringe and chain crystals for embroidery, and involves elaborate manual processes, which are typical of haute couture work.

Below, see how Prada makes the impossible possible by mixing embroidery with fringing.

The crystal embroidered dress

The dress – which takes up to 10 days to create – features a beautiful embroidered floral motif which has to be sewn onto a fringed design, and takes incredible technical skill to complete.

The process involves the fringe strip being placed on a frame and fixed onto gauze. With slow and precise movements, about 36 meters of crystal rhinestone chain, 12 meters of metal chain, 160 bezel rhinestones and 120 micro-cups are then attached stitch by stitch. Once the frame is carefully removed, the dress then has to be kept still for the next 24 hours.

There are 16 flowers embroidered on each dress and it takes nine to 10 hours to embroider a single flower. The preparation phase takes five to six hours, while the embroidery takes three to four hours to complete, making it an incredibly long and complex process.

The eyelet skirt

Another elaborate look from the collection is a fringed skirt with 75 metal eyelets. The complexity of the workmanship of this piece is seen in its structure, consisting of thousands of loose and constantly moving threads.

Initially, the embroiderer spreads the threads on a surface to comb and give them a uniform and compact appearance. The next step involves embroidering the thread loops on the fringe with thick, precise stitches, exactly at the points where the eyelets will be added.

During the final step of the studding process, the embroiderer manually places the eyelets one by one with the assistance of a small machine. The stud is pressed and fixed on the fringe by manually operating the lever. It takes around five days of work to create just one skirt.

See more incredible craftsmanship here.

It is easy to take for granted the craftsmanship that goes into making some of the world's most beautiful luxury products, which makes it all the more fascinating when you have the opportunity to see the process for yourself. Our new franchise, Inside The Atelier, celebrates exactly this. For our latest iteration, Prada has invited us in to see how its most intricate embroideries come to life.

One of the most complex techniques used in the house's latest collection involves the creation of those garments that consist solely of fringe and embroidery. The workmanship on these pieces uses both simple and precious raw materials, such as threads for fringe and chain crystals for embroidery, and involves elaborate manual processes, which are typical of haute couture work.

The crystal embroidered dress

The dress – which takes up to 10 days to create – features a beautiful embroidered floral motif which has to be sewn onto a fringed design, which takes a incredible technical skill. The process involves the fringe strip being placed on a frame and fixed onto gauze. With slow and precise movements, about 36 meters of crystal rhinestone chain, 12 meters of metal chain, 160 bezel rhinestones and 120 micro-cups are then attached stitch by stitch. Once the frame is removed, the dress is then kept still for the next 24 hours. There are 16 flowers embroidered on each dress and it takes nine to 10 hours to embroider a single flower. The preparation phase takes five to six hours, whereas the embroidery takes three to four hours to complete.

The eyelet skirt

Another elaborate look from the collection is a fringed skirt with 75 metal eyelets. The complexity of the workmanship is seen in its structure, consisting of thousands of loose and constantly moving threads. Initially, the embroiderer spreads the threads on a surface to comb and give them a uniform and compact appearance. The next step involves embroidering the thread loops on the fringe with thick, precise stitches, exactly at the points where the eyelets will be added. During the final step of the studding process, the embroiderer manually places the eyelets one by one with the assistance of a small machine. The stud is pressed and fixed on the fringe by manually operating the lever. It takes around five days of work to create one skirt.

Below, see in detail how the incredible embroideries come to life.

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