'Holy moly': Researchers' remarkable find under beach

·2-min read

A remarkable structure dating back to ancient Roman times has been found beneath the sand at a beach in southern Spain.

Researchers from the University of Cádiz (UCA) recently discovered Roman baths at the Caños de Meca beach in the country's Andalusia region, CNN reported.

The walls of the structure are reportedly more than four metres tall and two rooms have been unearthed so far.

The structure found by archaeologists on the Cadiz coast.
Researchers from the University of Cádiz (UCA) recently discovered Roman baths at the Caños de Meca beach in the country's Andalusia region. Source: Getty Images

The university said the site may sprawl across 2.5 acres. Inside, researchers found ceramics dating back to the 12th and 13th centuries.

According to Murcia Today, the find is particularly unusual for the country — Roman baths are generally found in a more degraded condition, however, experts believes the sand dunes may have helped preserve the site.

This isn't the only historic site researchers from UCA have recently found.

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At Cape Trafalgar, Andalusia, several Roman salting pools were discovered, each between five and six feet deep, CNN reported.

The remains of multiple people were uncovered inside.

Salting pools were used to preserve foo.

"In the first, there is a metal structure with an artificial cave with a 4,000-year-old burial, with seven corpses in a secondary position and one in a primary position before closing," the UCA statement says. 

Andalusia's culture minister, Patricia del Pozo, said the discovery was "wonderful".

Murcia Today said both sites were discovered by a team hoping to learn more about the production of fish during the Roman empire.

"The archaeological studies, undertaken by the University of Cádiz in March, April and May 2021 at Cape Trafalgar and on the Caños de Meca beach, have made it possible to 'document exceptional heritage finds, totally unpublished to date'," the university said in a statement.

"From Recent Prehistory (Bronze Age) to modern times, the existence of a diachronic settlement in the totally unknown area has been verified."

The Roman baths under the dunes that surround Cape Trafalgar.
A general view of the Roman baths under the dunes that surround Cape Trafalgar. Source: Getty Images

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