Mega-tsunami in Greenland caused by landslide not earthquake

The devastating 'mega-tsunami' in Greenland that washed away at least four people was caused by a massive landslide, according to scientists.

In June, waves more than 90 metres tall and travelling the length of a football field each second ravaged a number of towns along the coast.

The tsunami was initially believed to have been caused by a 4.1 magnitude earthquake, but seismologists now think a landslide falling 1000 metres was to blame, Stuff reported.

The landslide plunged into the ocean from Greenland's Karrat Fjord and pushed water levels up on the coastline.

The devastating 'Megatsunami' in Greenland that washed away at least four people was caused by a massive landslide. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
The devastating 'Megatsunami' in Greenland that washed away at least four people was caused by a massive landslide. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson

Footage taken from residents on the coast shows waves rolling onto the beach and submerging debris near a number of homes.

The small village of Nuugaatsiaq was evacuated but officials said four people are still missing and dozens are injured.

Professor Hermann Fritz of Georgia Tech in the US said the wave was travelling so quickly it would have taken only five minutes to get to a village 30km away.

Footage taken from residents on the coast shows waves and broken glaciers rolling onto the beach. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
Footage taken from residents on the coast shows waves and broken glaciers rolling onto the beach. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
The small village of Nuugaatsiaq was evacuated but officials said four people are still missing. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
The small village of Nuugaatsiaq was evacuated but officials said four people are still missing. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson

"The combination of a small earthquake from the plunge of the landslide, the sound, and unusual iceberg motion in the fjord prompted a spontaneous self-evacuation," he said.

The villages surrounding Karrat Fjord remain evacuated over fears of a second landslide with the unstable terrain.

Professor Hermann Fritz of Georgia Tech in the US said the wave was travelling so quickly it would have taken five minutes to travel 30 kilometres. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
Professor Hermann Fritz of Georgia Tech in the US said the wave was travelling so quickly it would have taken five minutes to travel 30 kilometres. Photo: Facebook/ Olina Angie K Nielson
The tsunami was initially believed to have been caused by an 4.1 magnitude earthquake, but seismologists now think a landslide falling 1000 metres was to blame. Photo: Twitter/  Professor Hermann Fritz
The tsunami was initially believed to have been caused by an 4.1 magnitude earthquake, but seismologists now think a landslide falling 1000 metres was to blame. Photo: Twitter/ Professor Hermann Fritz
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