The mobile phone app making everyday Aussies unlikely heroes

Melissa Buttigieg
News Reporter

A smartphone app is proving not all heroes wear capes, with the technology alerting everyday Australians to those needing emergency medical treatment in their area, to help save lives.

The “cutting-edge” GoodSAM app helps nationally-accredited and trained good Samaritans get to the scene of a medical emergency and step in to help until emergency services arrive.

A smartphone app connects everyday Australians to those needing life-saving CPR in their area. Source: Getty, file

The closest ambulance will always be dispatched immediately when a cardiac arrest emergency call is made to triple-0. But at the same time, three of the nearest GoodSAM responders also receive a ping on their phone to alert them of the emergency, so they can get started while an ambulance is on its way.

The app also connects GoodSAM responders to the nearest public defibrillators.

Who can register for the GoodSAM app?

Anyone in Victoria who has recently completed a nationally-recognised first aid course can register to be connected to local incidents, to help begin CPR and give basic life support.

GoodSAM is already being used by more than 5,000 paramedics, emergency service personnel and medical professionals. The technology has already helped revive almost 20 people who have suffered a cardiac arrest within a year of being launched, the Victorian Government confirmed.

The mobile app connects CPR-trained people to those who have suffered a cardiac arrest in their area. Source: Ambulance Victoria

‘Every second counts’ in cardiac arrest

“Every second counts when it comes to cardiac arrest,” Minister for Emergency Services Lisa Neville said.

“This revolutionary technology means good Samaritans can get to the scene of a cardiac arrest sooner – and that means lives saved and tragedies avoided.”

Having trained bystanders administer basic life support quickly helps to prevent the irreparable brain and heart damage, which can occur during a cardiac arrest or traumatic incident.

Paramedics will take over from a good Samaritan who has been alerted to a person in need of CPR through the GoodSAM mobile phone app. Source: Ambulance Victoria

Thanks to the smartphone technology, an army of first-aid qualified responders is growing, willing to step in and help save a life, said Victorian Minister for Ambulance Services Jenny Mikakos.

“More Victorians than ever before are surviving a cardiac arrest, thanks to faster response times and everyday Victorians who rush to the aid of their fellow citizens,” she said.

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