Foley defeats Baird in pre-election debate

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7News viewers have voted and backed Opposition Leader Luke Foley over Premier Mike Baird in the second NSW leaders' debate.

Whilst the latest 7News/ReachTEL poll shows the LNP leading 53 percent to 47, showing little change in one week.


Judgement Day is March 28 but for the main party leaders in the NSW Election today was the day to perform - and they did.

Foley and Premier Mike Baird each have millions of voters to impress in a short time.


Luke Foley has been Labor and Opposition Leader for only two months - he won the toss and spoke first - his top priority, a $3 billion pledge for education.

"Our priorities are very clear, to invest in our schools and our hospitals and to keep our electricity network in public hands," Foley said.

While premier Mike Baird was about Liberal Party bread and butter issues - the economy.

"NSW is now leading the country again," Baird said. "Indeed, we've created a hundred thousand new jobs."

With a capacity, under the Coalition, to create 122,000 more jobs, says 'Baird the Builder'.

"...$20 billion on the infrastructure we need, more rail, more roads, more schools, more hospitals."

To fund it, however, would be the most contested issue of the campaign, Mike Baird's plan to sell off ageing electricity assets.

"It just doesn't make business sense, Mark, to sell off a profitable electricity network tat last year returned $1.7b to state coffers," Foley said.

Foley won the coin toss and opened the live 7News leaders' debate. Photo: 7News
Foley won the coin toss and opened the live 7News leaders' debate. Photo: 7News

Baird response was that, "under this lease it will not pressure on prices short medium long term."

Both parties are haunted by corruption findings at the ICAC, with Foley conceding that Labor deserved to lose the last election.

Whilst Baird said that voters have had enough of people looking after themselves, "and not the people we've got the privilege of representing".

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