First vaccine recipient makes embarrassing ScoMo admission

Kamilia Palu
·News Editor
·3-min read

Australia’s first Covid vaccine recipient became an internet sensation on Sunday when she innocently made a rude gesture to a room full of journalists while sitting next to the Prime Minister.

The pair received the Covid-19 vaccine on camera as a “curtain raiser” to the national rollout, which kicked off today.

But, despite the high-profile moment, World War II survivor Jane Malysiak revealed she initially didn’t know who Scott Morrison was while he was seated next to her.

In an interview with Sky News, host Laura Jayes asked Ms Malysiak about being the first person in the queue for the vaccine - even before the leader of the nation.

Jane. Source: Sky NewsWorld War II survivor Jane Malysiak appeared on Sky News on Monday with hosy Laura Jayes. Source: Sky News
World War II survivor Jane Malysiak appeared on Sky News on Monday with hosy Laura Jayes. Source: Sky News

“You were ahead of the prime minister yesterday - was that a bit awkward?” Jayes asked.

“No, it was not awkward,” Ms Malysiak replied. “And I did not recognise him ’til later on when I asked, ‘where is the prime minister?’.

“They told me that, ‘this is the prime minister, you’ve seen him, you've seen him’.

“And he was very, very nice. I didn’t know!”

After their needles, Mr Morrison posed with Ms Malysiak, inviting her to do a peace sign, or a ‘V for vaccine’ gesture.

Instead, she held her hand facing backwards, offering a very different meaning to the hand sign.

Hilariously, she repeated the gesture several times in the interview with Sky News, telling Jayes she never knew about the offensive meaning, and admits she can never remember which way is the right way.

“See, now I’ve learned something!” she laughed.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison sits alongside aged care resident Jane Malysiak.
Ms Malysiak accidentally made the rude gesture while seated next to Prime Minister Scott Morrison - who she also didn't recognise at first. Source: AAP

Vaccines rolled out nationwide 

Health and border control workers, and aged care residents and their carers have started getting the Pfizer vaccine at hubs across the country.

The vaccines free and voluntary, but health experts are urging all Australians to get the coronavirus vaccine once they are able.

Australia's deputy chief medical officer Michael Kidd concedes about 20 per cent of the community are hesitant about getting a vaccination.

He has sought to assure Australians the medical regulator has undertaken rigorous testing to ensure the jabs are safe and efficient.

"Please, when it comes to be your turn, please line up along with the rest of us and get your vaccine," Dr Kidd said.

Aged care resident Jane Malysiak receives the first Codid-19 vaccine in Australia during a visit to Castle Hill Medical Centre to preview the COVID-19 vaccination program on Sunday, February 21, 2021. (AAP Image/Joel Carrett) NO ARCHIVING
Ms Malysiak receives the first Codid-19 vaccine in Australia during a visit to Castle Hill Medical Centre. Source: AAP

Dr Kidd said the vaccines were effective at preventing serious cases of Covid-19 but further insights would be known in coming months.

"We don't know if people can still become infected and be at risk of asymptomatic transmission to other people, and we don't yet know how long the immunity conferred by the vaccine will last."

While vaccinations are not compulsory for aged care workers, the nation's top medical panel are still considering the issue.

Aged Care Minister Richard Colbeck said any changes would be based on advice from medical experts, but he expected most workers in the sector to get the jab.

"That's the indications that we're seeing so far, not just in aged care but I think there is a great anticipation in the community," he told Sky News.

- with AAP

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