Ex-cyclone Seth causes wild surf in Qld

·2-min read

Queenslanders have been warned they will put lives at risk if they do not stay away from beaches in the state's southeast, with wild conditions caused by ex-tropical cyclone Seth set to intensify.

However, the Bureau of Meteorology insists the former cyclone - now a tropical low - has "done its dash" and is expected to peter out in the coming days.

Deputy Police Commissioner Steven Gollschewski has urged people to avoid the surf with the ex-cyclone heading toward the Queensland coast on Tuesday.

Huge swells have forced beaches to be closed across the Gold Coast, the Sunshine Coast as well as Moreton Bay and North Stradbroke Islands.

Surf Life Saving Queensland said they had been involved in 110 rescues primarily off southeast beaches on Monday and another 20 on the Sunshine Coast on Tuesday.

"It was disappointing to see yesterday that there are a number of rescues across southeast Queensland on our beaches," Mr Gollschewski said.

"So please everyone, go and look at the surf and please stay out of it. You're putting other people at risk if you go into it."

The ex-tropical cyclone, located off the Gold Coast, prompted a hazardous surf warning from Fraser Island to the Gold Coast.

Abnormally high tides for Fraser Island, the Gold Coast and Sunshine Coast as well as northern NSW have been forecast with water levels up to 0.5m higher than usual and coastal erosion also expected on exposed beaches.

A 2.1m high tide peaked on the Gold Coast about 9.30am on Tuesday, with the local council handing out almost 1000 sandbags for businesses and locals.

A nine-metre wave was recorded off Tweed Heads late on Monday, with a shipping container full of beer washed away at Currumbin.

Damaging winds of up to 100 km/h have also been predicted for coastal areas and higher terrain including Gold Coast, Maroochydore, Coolangatta, Noosa Heads, Cleveland and Redcliffe.

Dangerous surf conditions have also hit northern NSW with waves averaging 5m and up to 10m recorded at Byron Bay, forcing the closure of multiple beaches.

BOM meteorologist Helen Reid said conditions would continue to be hazardous but the ex-cyclone would weaken by Wednesday.

"It looks like it has done its dash," she told AAP.

"We are not going to say, 'Yeah you are free to go to the beach again' because it still looks like difficult conditions.

"But it looks like the worst of it will be today and easing tomorrow. People just need to be patient and take heed of safety advice."

The system was expected to bring rain in the state's southeast and northern NSW in the coming days but not significant amounts.

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