Dolly Everett's parents reveal bullying that led to daughter's death

The heartbroken parents of Northern Territory teenager Amy “Dolly” Everett have revealed details about the sheer torment their daughter endured before her death.

The former face of Akubra hats was just 14 years old when she took her life on January 3, having endured years of bullying at the Queensland private school she attended, her parents Tick and Kate Everett said in an emotional interview.

“She told me that boys were calling her a sl**, she was 12,” Ms Everett told A Current Affair.

“I don’t know whether 12-year-olds even know what that means, they shouldn’t.

This photo taken in 2009 and provided by Akubra Hats, shows Amy “Dolly” Everett in Brunette Downs in the Northern Territory, Australia. Source: AP
This photo taken in 2009 and provided by Akubra Hats, shows Amy “Dolly” Everett in Brunette Downs in the Northern Territory, Australia. Source: AP

“I used to tell her: it will get better, you’ll fit in. Everybody’s trying to fit in and they’re just working out their pecking order. Try not to be mean’.”

The Everett’s said an email sent from their daughter while she was at school gave them an insight as to just how severe the bullying was.

Dolly told them how she was being ganged up on, with one student calling her a “dirty sl**, b****”.

But Ms Everett said their daughter continued to put on a brave face and was determined to prove she was strong enough to return to school.

Kate and Tick Everett revealed details about the torment their daughter endured in the lead-up to her death. Source: Sunrise/ACA
Kate and Tick Everett revealed details about the torment their daughter endured in the lead-up to her death. Source: Sunrise/ACA
Dolly Everett’s family want a national blue heart rating system to stop bullying at schools
Dolly Everett’s family want a national blue heart rating system to stop bullying at schools

“She just went from the most enjoyable little girl to someone that did end up in trouble at school – there’s so much that I found out now, as opposed to then, and it probably would’ve made the outcome so much different,” Ms Everett said.

Their new foundation, Dolly’s Dream, will push for a national approach to bullying and cyber safety in schools, hoping each will one day have a star-style rating that reflects the strength of their prevention and response strategies.

But instead of stars, the grieving parents hope every school across the country will one day have a blue heart rating – featuring the foundation’s logo – a blue heart, with a butterfly at its centre.

Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14.

Suicide Call Back Service 1300 659 467.

Kids Helpline 1800 551 800.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting