Dakota Johnson Explained Why "Madame Web" Went So Wrong

Dakota Johnson understands why people aren't the biggest fans of Madame Web.

Dakota in a v-neck gown posing in front of promotional backdrop for Madame Web
Hector Vivas / Getty Images

In case you missed it, the Sony spidey-movie debuted on Valentine's Day to shambolic reviews and a lackluster box office. As recently as last month, the titular Madame Web herself hadn't even seen it.

  Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection
Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

In a new interview with Bustle, Dakota reacted to the heavy panning the movie received. "Unfortunately, I’m not surprised that this has gone down the way it has," she said.

closeup of dakota in a webbed dress
Steve Granitz / FilmMagic

Dakota chalked up her lack of surprise to how "hard" it is to get movies made, even at smaller studios. She explained, "Decisions are being made by committees, and art does not do well when it’s made by committee. Films are made by a filmmaker and a team of artists around them. You cannot make art based on numbers and algorithms."

Four women walking on a city street, appearing engaged in conversation, dressed in casual attire in a scene from Madame Web
Jessica Kourkounis / Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

The actor continued, "My feeling has been for a long time that audiences are extremely smart, and executives have started to believe that they’re not. Audiences will always be able to sniff out bullshit. Even if films start to be made with AI, humans aren’t going to fucking want to see those."

  Jeff Spicer / Getty Images for Sony Pictures
Jeff Spicer / Getty Images for Sony Pictures

"But it was definitely an experience for me to make that movie. I had never done anything like it before. I probably will never do anything like it again because I don’t make sense in that world. And I know that now," she added, further saying that the initial project she signed onto was quite different from what came out on screens.

Man in a suit speaking with a woman with her back to the camera in a dimly lit room
Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

"It was a real learning experience, and of course it’s not nice to be a part of something that’s ripped to shreds, but I can’t say that I don’t understand," Dakota said. "That’s why I have my own company. In a movie like that, I have no say about anything."

  Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection
Marvel / Columbia Pictures / Courtesy Everett Collection

You can read the full interview here.