'CHILLING': Disturbing moment British prisoner appears on Russian state TV

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·Associate News Editor
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A British fighter who was captured by Russian soldiers after joining Ukrainian forces has featured in a disturbing moment aired on Russian state TV.

Aiden Aslin, 28, has been sentenced to death after a Russian proxy court's decision last month and has now appeared singing Russia's national anthem.

In video shared via Russia Today journalist Roman Kosarev, a shaven-headed Mr Aslin is seen wearing navy track pants, a red t-shirt and red shirt.

Aiden Aslin, who was sentenced to death in June, has sung the Russian national anthem on state TV. Source: Twitter
Aiden Aslin, who was sentenced to death in June, has sung the Russian national anthem on state TV. Source: Twitter

Standing next to him is exiled US conspiracy theorist John Mark Dougan, who is now believed to be fuelling Russian propaganda working with pro-Russian media.

Dougan encourages Mr Aslin as he sings for roughly two minutes, standing straight with his arms by his side, as his eyes move around the room. Once finished, Dougan tells him he was "f****** amazing".

The stunt was part of an interview Dougan conducted with Mr Aslin. Dougan has denied he forced Mr Aslin to sing the anthem, saying he treated hims "as a friend" and that he was being treated "very well".

Independent Russian publication Meduza’s English-language editor Kevin Rothrock described the video as "chilling".

"Presumably he hopes this will keep him alive?" he asked on Twitter.

Brits Aiden Aslin, Shaun Pinner and Moroccan Brahim Saadoun pictured in court. Source: Reuters
Brits Aiden Aslin, Shaun Pinner and Moroccan Brahim Saadoun pictured in court. Source: Reuters

Mr Aslin believes 'time is running out'

Mr Aslin is believed to be in a detention centre in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk, where he is due to be executed by firing squad. It was a decision made by a court in the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic, a region recognised only by Russia and Syria.

He was captured in April alongside fellow Brit Shaun Pinner, 48 in the city of Mariupol, one of the city's worst hit by Russia's invasion.

They had moved to Ukraine in 2016 and were enrolled in the Ukrainian marines, however they were still treated as mercenaries.

Several rallies have been held in his native England, demanding an end to Russian President Vladimir Putin's "war crimes", the BBC reported.

Speaking to his family by telephone, he told them he believes his "time is running out".

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