'Raw' chicken sashimi emerges as niche Japanese cuisine – but would you eat it?

The idea of eating raw chicken is, quite literally, sickening for most people - but for some international foodies, chicken sashimi is a growing trend.

Sashimi, the Japanese delicacy of thinly sliced raw fish or meat, is becoming increasingly popular in western countries.

But chicken sashimi or 'torisashi', a step too far for some, is also available in Japan and some niche international restaurants around the world.

Raw chicken is a delicacy in Japan. Source: Instagram/Watchand
Raw chicken is a delicacy in Japan. Source: Instagram/Watchand

The dish is often served completely raw, or lightly seared, with garnishes and dipping sauces.

Many travellers who are daring enough to try it take to Instagram to share photos of their meals with the hashtag #chickensashimi.

But an Australian food safety expert has warning holidaymakers that it's not worth the risk.

Lydia Buchtmann from The Food Safety Information Council has some simple words of advice: "Don't do it".

"There's no health benefits, in fact it's really dangerous," she told Yahoo7. "To do it with poultry is basically insane."

Consuming undercooked poultry can lead to salmonella and Campylobacter, a bacterial infection that commonly causes gastro.

Some consumers say they've been eating raw chicken for years, with no side effects. Source: Instagram/Willcookwilleat
Some consumers say they've been eating raw chicken for years, with no side effects. Source: Instagram/Willcookwilleat
The dish is often served with garnishes and dipping sauces. Source: Instagram/iotalist
The dish is often served with garnishes and dipping sauces. Source: Instagram/iotalist

"Food poisoning is not a minor problem, it could be lethal," Ms Buchtmann said, referring to the recent fatalities caused by listeria found in rockmelons and cheese.

"Make sure you cook any chicken to 75C in the middle. You can't tell by looking so buy a cheap meat thermometer and check you've cooked it properly."

A NSW Food Authority spokesperson said there are penalties for handling food in an unsafe manner and for selling unsafe food.

"All cafés, restaurants and retail food outlets must practice safe food handling and preparation to meet food safety requirements," the spokesperson said.

"Chicken requires a cooking temperature of 74 degrees Celsius to destroy harmful bacteria."

The warnings have not deterred some diners, with many showing off their meal on social media.

One man who posted a photo of his chicken sashimi online last month was questioned by his followers for his interesting meal choice.

"Any food poisoning after the chicken sashimi?" they wrote.

He replied: "Nope, perfectly fine!"

Another diner, who ate the meal in Kawasaki last month, said it "tasted way better than it sounds".

For curious Australian consumers, the Food Safety Information Council warns:
For curious Australian consumers, the Food Safety Information Council warns:
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