British paedophile who groomed Kenyan children caught after holidaymaker's 'gut instinct'

Jamie Johnson
Keith Morris, from Hull, travelled to a rural village in Kilifi County over a period of about 20 years, and met with groups of young girls

A British paedophile who preyed on vulnerable Kenyan children was caught after a holidaymaker used ‘gut instinct’ to report him to authorities.

Keith Morris, from Hull, travelled to a rural village in Kilifi County over a period of about 20 years, and met with groups of young girls, but was flagged to the National Crime Agency by  David Bushell after the tourist believed something was "seriously wrong."

Bushell, from London, said that he observed Morris over three days after spotting the 72-year-old with groups of girls aged between 10 and 12.

Speaking to the BBC, he said: "I felt like something was wrong but I was not really sure why the alarm bells were ringing.

"By the second day I felt like I just wanted to go and confront him and ask 'What are you doing with these children? What relationship are they to you?'”

After hotel staff told Bushell that Morris was in the process of adopting eight girls, he called the NCA. 

"Ultimately if there is nothing wrong then all you will do is cause someone a small amount of stress but if there's something seriously wrong you may save someone's life or save them from the horrendous actions of someone that is quite monstrous," he said.

Morris, a retired locksmith, was convicted at Leeds Crown Court of four counts of rape, four counts of assault by penetration, two charges of sexual assault and two counts of perverting the course of justice.

A spokesperson from the NCA said: “This report from a member of the public played an integral part in the operation.

“Child sexual abuse is a very difficult crime to detect and we know that it is difficult for victims to report too.

“We rely on the public to have the confidence to be able to report crimes of a sexual nature to the authorities, especially child sexual abuse and this is why there is a need for clear reporting processes.

 “It is everyone’s business to keep children safe from harm.”

Mike Canning, from the NSPCC, said: "Gut feelings are important. If something doesn't feel right it's often because it isn't right.

"We would encourage anyone who has got a concern to phone up and talk it through."