Bishop flags Timor visit on the cards

Lisa Martin
Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has praised East Timor's well-ordered and peaceful election

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop hopes to soon break the drought on Australian government ministerial visits to East Timor.

There has been no ministerial visits to East Timor since the coalition government came to power in 2013.

But it appears some breathing space has opened up in Australian-East Timor ties.

A new government is taking shape in Dili, and a long-running maritime boundary dispute with Australia was put to bed earlier this year.

Timor's court of appeal has ruled a political coalition led by independence hero Xanana Gusmao has won a majority of parliamentary seats in this month's election.

The vote was called in a bid to end months of deadlock in the tiny Southeast Asian country's parliament, where there had been a minority government led by then-prime minister Mari Alkatiri.

Foreign Minister Julie Bishop has praised East Timor's well-ordered and peaceful poll.

She told reporters in Canberra on Wednesday she'll be looking to visit Dili as soon as the new prime minister and cabinet are in place .

Labor's foreign affairs spokeswoman Penny Wong has also flagged scope for strengthening ties.

"The elections confirm the strength of (East Timor's) young democracy, having only first held democratic elections in 2001," she said.

After years of bitter wrangling, Australia and East Timor in March signed a historic treaty at the United Nations to resolve a maritime boundary dispute.

The deal also carves up $56 billion in potential revenue from oil and gas reserves in the Timor Sea.

East Timor, one of the world's most impoverished nations, will reap between 70 to 80 per cent of the revenue from the Greater Sunrise fields under the agreement.

Timorese people in their thousands had staged protests outside of Australia's embassy in Dili in the years leading up to the renegotiation of the treaty.