AstraZeneca to reissue vaccine trial data following claim it gave 'incomplete view'

Lucy Harley-McKeown
·2-min read
AstraZeneca's North America headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, US. Photo: Rachel Wisniewski/Reuters
AstraZeneca's North America headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, US. Photo: Rachel Wisniewski/Reuters

AstraZeneca (AZN.L) on Tuesday said it will reissue the key data of its American clinical trial "within 48 hours" after a leading US agency on infectious diseases claimed the company may have given "incomplete" picture of the efficacy of the shot.

Shares in the Oxford COVID-19 vaccine maker fell 1.3% as the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) in US said that testing data released by the pharma company had included outdated information.

The board expressed the concerns to the National National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which in turn released a statement saying this “may have provided an incomplete view of the efficacy data.”

“We urge the company to work with the DSMB to review the efficacy data and ensure the most accurate, up-to-date efficacy data be made public as quickly as possible,” it said.

AstraZeneca responded with its statement on Tuesday afternoon saying it would reissue the key data.

The statement comes barely a day after AstraZeneca said a US study indicated its vaccine is safe and effective.

Although AstraZeneca stock was down in London on Tuesday morning, it had still recouped its losses from five days ago, when fears the vaccine could cause blood clots meant several European countries halted its use.

Five-day look at AstraZeneca. Chart: Yahoo Finance UK
Five-day look at AstraZeneca. Chart: Yahoo Finance UK

Those fears have since been quelled and several countries continued its roll out by Friday after the EU medicines regulator deemed it “safe and effective” for use on Thursday night.

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Germany, Italy and Spain were among the countries to resume the rollout, along with Portugal, the Netherlands, Latvia, Lithuania, Cyprus and Bulgaria.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) concluded on Thursday that the benefits of the jab outweighed the possible risks, but that it would continue to study possible links between rare blood clots and the vaccine.

Around 5 million Europeans have already received the AstraZeneca jab so far.

Yahoo Finance UK contacted AstraZeneca for comment on the most recent claims but had not heard back at the time of publication.

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