Apocalypse Now: Sweltering Weather Hits Scary New Record

ETIENNE LAURENT/AFP via Getty
ETIENNE LAURENT/AFP via Getty

June’s heat broke records, and climate experts say there’s no end in sight.

According to the European climate service Copernicus, for the past 13 months, the global temperature has been 2.7 degrees Fahrenheit warmer “than pre-industrial” times.

This change, which translates to 1.5 degrees Celsius, is a critical marker as it’s the number many nations agreed upon staying below when they joined the Paris Agreement. President Joe Biden rejoined the agreement at the start of his presidency in 2021 after Donald Trump withdrew from it in 2019. The agreement’s purpose is to stave off climate change.

“This is more than a statistical oddity and it highlights a continuing shift in our climate,” Copernicus’ director Carlo Buontempo said in a statement.

In June, the global average temperature was 62 degrees, which set a new record for the hottest June on record, according to Copernicus. June was also the third hottest month ever, according to Copernicus’ records, which date back to 1940.

The record-breaking heat has left much of the United States sweltering through unbearable temperatures. Over the weekend, in Death Valley, a motorcyclist died after temperatures topped 128 degrees.

On Monday, one of the major bridges into Manhattan had to be shut down after it overheated. Fireboats were sent in and, per a NBC New York X video, were seen hosing down the Third Avenue Bridge.

But it’s not just hot places getting warmer that’s concerning. Places that aren’t used to this type of unseasonably hot weather are getting hit. According to The New York Times, regions like the Pacific Northwest, which are known for more mild summers, are getting swamped with “30 degrees above” normal temperatures.

So, what can be done to beat the heat? According to the Red Cross, it is paramount to get enough water, at least 96 ounces per day. Also, taking a cold shower and spending as much time as possible indoors are great ways to mitigate “heat-related illness.”

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