Irish coach Schmidt expects a 'challenging day' from Los Pumas

Dublin (AFP) - Revenge will not be on Ireland's minds when they face Argentina on Saturday at Lansdowne Road for the first time since the Pumas dashed their 2015 World Cup hopes in a 43-20 quarter-final victory.

Irish coach Schmidt expects a 'challenging day' from Los Pumas

Irish coach Schmidt expects a 'challenging day' from Los Pumas

Instead, Irish head coach Joe Schmidt expects a "challenging day" even against a side that has won just two Tests this year and only ended a seven match losing run against Six Nations whipping boys Italy last Saturday.

It certainly promises to be a baptism of fire for a raw and inexperienced centre pairing of Bundee Aki and Chris Farrell, who have won one cap -- the experienced Robbie Henshaw having been ruled out with a hamstring injury.

"They (the Pumas) have a host of threats out there and it will be a really challenging day," said Schmidt, whose side are bidding to round off the November Tests with a perfect played three, won three.

"The type of player they have will be a real challenge for us.

"The footwork of Matias Moroni and Santiago Gonzalo Iglesias and with Nicolas Sanchez (who orchestrated the World Cup victory, scoring 23 of their points) directing affairs will be a real Test."

Schmidt, whose side have posted a record 38-3 victory over South Africa before a second string team eked out a 23-20 win over Fiji, said Henshaw's injury and that of three other potential first choice centres was unfortunate, but the players would have to cope.

"They will have to independently survive and not have someone directing them round the pitch," said Schmidt.

"We want to play through destabilising periods and that really started last November scrambling our way to victory over Australia with several injuries throughout the match and having to switch players to positions they weren't accustomed to."

- 'Not a grudge match' -

Schmidt, who has handed a first Test cap to wing Adam Byrne, said there is no point in motivating the players into thinking of Saturday's match as a revenge mission.

"First of all there are only at most half a dozen of our players from that match playing on Saturday," said the 52-year-old New Zealander.

"It is not to my mind a grudge match.

"If we are looking back two years ago, how can we look forward? There is a real danger in looking too far back.

"This is just about trying to get a bit of cohesion."

Rob Kearney, one of the few to have played that day in 2015 and to be picked again on Saturday, says the defeat was crushing morale wise but that he and the team have moved on since then, especially with the arrival of Andy Farrell as defence coach.

"We'd like to think we are a very different team than we were two years ago," said the 31-year-old fullback, who will win his 78th cap.

"We've changed our defence system significantly. We defended poorly that day."

Argentina at least arrive emboldened by the win over Italy -- one which their assistant coach Pablo Bouza told AFP earlier in the week was a "must win" match -- but flanker Pablo Matera admits the Irish team they play on Saturday is a different proposition to the "tidy" and more predictable one he and his team-mates beat in 2015.

"They are a really unpredictable team and I think they are not just a physical team," said the 24-year-old, who despite his youth already has 45 caps to his credit.

"They have a lot of options in attack and you need to be really concentrated in defence because you never know where they will attack you."

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