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Mackayla’s ‘miracle’ survival after misdiagnosis
Mackayla’s ‘miracle’ survival after misdiagnosis

A three-year-old girl, who swallowed a button battery that almost killed her, was prescribed antibiotics for a virus by her GP.

Mackayla O’Conner first complained to her mother after suffering stomach pains.

"She said that she had put something in her mouth and she pointed at her chest saying 'it's in here'," Mrs O'Connor said.

The Dee Why toddler's temperature shot up 30 minutes later, and within an hour she was vomiting blood.

Mackayla’s mother rushed her to their local doctor, who said it was merely coincidental she was experiencing such symptoms after swallowing something.

The pair were sent home, but 24 hours later, Mackayla’s health had deteriorated so they went to several other clinics.

Over four days, they was repeatedly told that Mackayla had a virus and that there was no need to take an X-ray.

The following night, the O’Conners finally convinced doctors to do an X-ray, which showed an object in Mackayla’s chest. She was immediately rushed to the emergency ward at Randwick Children's Hospital.

Mackayla’s surgeon said it was a miracle she survived, after the battery burnt a hole in her oesophagus, close to a main artery.

After three weeks in hospital, Mackayla is recovering well, but there’s no guarantee she won’t suffer complications in the future.

Her mother is urging other parents to trust their instincts, because if she hadn't of persisted her daughter would have been dead.

"I just want to say to other parents to be strong if you know that something is wrong," Mrs O'Connor said.

While Westmead Hospital says the incident serves as a timely warning for the Christmas holidays, saying that toy batteries can poison kids and cause serious harm if ingested.

"It is important to ensure that batteries are secured properly in toys and screws are tightened to prevent children from accessing them." Dr McCaskill said.

POTENTIALLY FATAL: Girl, who swallowed a button battery that almost killed her, was prescribed antibiotics. Photo: File