The Morning After: Disney+ is losing some old movies

Richard Lawler
Senior News Editor

Hey, good morning! You look fabulous.

Welcome to your weekend, and the calm before the storm. Soon, CES 2020 will start and we'll be overrun by electronic things that are coming to store shelves later this year. The tricky part will be figuring out which ones are worth paying attention to, and which ones will never make it to market. I've been in Las Vegas for less than a day, and so far the biggest change this year is a slight redesign of the hotel we're staying in -- by Monday we should have updates that are a lot more exciting.

-- Richard

It's time.CES 2020: What to expect

The annual event for all things tech kicks off in Las Vegas next week, and we'll be there to check it all out. Here's a sneak peek at what to expect in cars, home automation, TVs, computers and 5G.

8K TVs! Better ultraportables! Sex tech!Engadget Podcast: CES 2020 here we come!

This week, Devindra and Cherlynn chat about how the infamous trade show has evolved over the years, and the new innovations they're actually looking forward to.

And no, you can't keep them by downloading them.Disney+ loses some movies due to old licensing deals

Disney only launched its streaming service a few months ago, but several movies that were available at launch are no longer available for viewing. Those include flicks like Home Alone 1 & 2, Dr. Dolittle and Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides. The culprit? Licensing deals signed long ago that occasionally make those titles exclusive to other channels or services.

Remember where Xbox, Nintendo and PlayStation were 10 years ago?The 10-year challenge: Video game edition

A decade is a long time in gaming, and Jessica Conditt is ready to run down how all the major players have changed their positions since 2009. Take Activision, for example. In 2009, its top product was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2, and in 2019, its top product was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare. Wait...

Subscribers will be refunded for their latest payment.Google is killing digital magazines in News

Did you remember that Google offered paid magazine subscriptions? Well, it doesn't now. A company spokesperson has confirmed the change to Engadget, noting that the program worked with under 200 publishers. Subscribers won't be able to purchase new magazine issues anymore, but they can thankfully still keep accessing old issues (PDFs and other formats) in the Google News app via the Following or Favorites tab.

But wait, there's more...

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