Hyundai's Vision T concept SUV looks like a driveable TIE Fighter

Andrew Tarantola
Senior Editor
Engadget

Hyundai took to the stage at Automobility LA 2019 to show off the latest evolution of its "concept SUV" now dubbed, the Vision T, as well as note some minor updates to its Ioniq line of eco-friendly sedans.

The Ioniq already comes in three varieties: a gas-electric hybrid billed as "the most fuel-efficient car in America." It retails for $22,500 and offers 58 combined MPG. There's also a $25,350 PHEV offering a combined range of 630 miles (as well as 29 all-electric miles) and a $29,815 full-electric model that will deliver 124 miles on a single charge at 136 MPGe. The updated Ionic full-electric bumps that single-charge range up to 170 miles and can charge up to 80 percent capacity in under an hour.

Hyundai also walked the assembled press through its new RN19, a monstrous mid-engine RWD version of the company's Veloster model. It reportedly boasts a sub-5 second 0-60 and an artificially limited 155 MPH top speed. It might even come with an electric (or at least hybrid) powertrain. The $60,000 question, however, is whether the company will actually release it to the public. At Wednesday's press conference, company reps insisted that the vehicle was simply a prototype, but fingers crossed.

The big news of the day was, of course, the Vision T. It looks like a cross between the Range Rover Evoque and a TIE fighter with a flat hood and roofline, short bumper overhangs, sharp angles and broad flat surfaces. It's, in a word, gorgeous. Unfortunately, as a concept vehicle, there's even less of a chance that we'll see this on the street than the RN-19. Instead, Hyundai is using it to provide a broad overview of where it plans to take its burgeoning Tucson compact SUV line.

One feature we will likely see in the coming years is the Vision T's unique grill and headlight setup. Its semi-integrated headlights blend seamlessly into the front of the vehicle until they're activated while the front grill is dappled with triangular chevrons. These design details are actually quite functional as they also serve as active vents, opening and closing as needed to maintain the vehicle's efficiency regardless of how fast you're driving.